The Rowan Pure Wool Worsted Knit-A-Long – Week 1

Tags

, , , ,

Yesterday Rowan Yarns has published the first clue for the Pure Wool Worsted Knit-A-Long with Martin Storey.

Week 1 - Garter Stitch Waves

Week 1 – Garter Stitch Waves

And there is another update to this Knit-A-Long too. Viovioletta has translated the pattern in Spanish language. Isn’t that great.

Martin suggested Redcurrant and Grasshopper for this first 6 squares.

Rowan Pure Wool Worsted - Redcurrant 120

Rowan Pure Wool Worsted – Redcurrant 120

Rowan Pure Wool Worsted - Grasshopper 130

Rowan Pure Wool Worsted – Grasshopper 130

And there is a YouTube Video from Martin himself giving you more information about this week’s square design.

You already know I have chosen different shades than Martin suggested. So I started to knit my week one clue with Olive and Crimson.

Rowan Pure Wool Worsted - Olive 125

Rowan Pure Wool Worsted – Olive 125

Rowan Pure Wool Worsted - Crimson 123

Rowan Pure Wool Worsted – Crimson 123

I managed to knit 1 square in about 1 hour and I have finished all my 6 squares last night.

Garter Stitch Wave - Olive

Garter Stitch Wave – Olive

Garter Stitch Wave - Crimson

Garter Stitch Wave – Crimson

Happy knitting until next time for the second clue.

For more information about this Knit-A-Long you may read also here.

There is no hurry! The Rowan Pure Wool Worsted Knit-A-Long-Update!

Tags

, , , ,

Are you ready to join in or have already joined the Rowan Pure Wool Worsted Knit-A-Long with the fantastic Rowan designer Martin Storey?

Well, here are some updates:

First

Dates to remember, UPDATE, FIRST CLUE IS SOONER!: 
First clue: Thursday, April 17 (Now everyone has the allowance to knit-a-long during the Easter Holidays!)
all other clues will be provided Monday, April 28 and every Monday afterward!

Second

You will need a free membership at www.knitrowan.com to download the clues.

See this page for download instructions, if you are having trouble.

Third

Watch a YouTube intro to the KAL with Martin Storey!

Forth

If you still have troubles to choose your colours here are my chosen shades!

See you knitting!

 

Are you ready for the Rowan Pure Wool Worsted Knit-A-Long?

Tags

, , , , , ,

There is still enough time to be part of the Rowan Pure Wool Worsted Knit-a-long.

You will knit an afghan designed by Martin Storey using the new Rowan Yarn Pure Wool Worsted (100% wool) which is available in 50 shades. The KAL is starting on April 21st and will last for 9 weeks. In the first eight weeks the patterns will be released and in the ninth week Martin Storey will show you how to join them to make a stunning afghan.

You will knit 48 squares in different patterns. Each pattern will be knit up to a 20×20 cm square. The patterns will be available for free on the Rowan website. But remember you have to be a Row@n Member to be able to download the patterns. But no worry, it’s absolutely free. And Rowan will give technical advice on the Rowan website, including videos.

There is also a discussion board on the Rowan Yarns group on Ravelry. You can join this group for information, chatting and showcasing your colours and finished pieces. You may also visit the Rowan Yarns Facebook page for further information.

And finally here is the shopping list for this Rowan Pure Wool Worsted Knit-a-long.

I have already chosen my shades (hope you like them)…

 

…and waiting for the first pattern to be released.

SHEKNITS/HEKNITS – A KAL2 with Kristen & Konrad

Tags

, , , , ,

In my last article I have shown you my suggested modifications of Trinity.

I will change this design originally knitted for women into a knitwear design for a man.

One of my suggested modifications is to knit a closer neckline.

As you can see in the picture below, this design is featuring a v neck.

Trinity by Lisa Richardson

Trinity by Lisa Richardson

Making a neck line closer is not really difficult. The only things you need are some mathematics and of course your correct tension.

So – I know no one can here it any more (except my dear friend Anne from Life LackaDaisiCal, who is regularly  asking: “Have YOU done a swatch?”) – you must have knitted a swatch to know your correct tension!

Let’s have a look at the neckline:

Schematic 1

Schematic 1

In schematic 1 you see, you can not only knit some more rows, before starting the v-neck shaping. You will end up with to much stitches for the shoulders when you reach the cast off row, unless you haven’t changed the width of the neck.

Let’s start out from you don’t want to change the width of the neck, then you need to modify the decreases of your neckline.

Schematic 2

Schematic 2

In schematic 2 you see the modified neckline. You notice to get the same width of the neckline, you have to decrease faster.

A classic v neck begins shaping close to armhole depth. So the second thing you need to know (first thing is your tension, “After you have knitted a swatch“, Anne says) is your armhole depth!

Now you are able to calculate how many rows you are knitting from starting the armhole shaping to starting the shoulder shaping.

For example: If your armhole depth is 20 cm and your tension is 21 sts and 34 rows in 10 cm, you have to knit (20 x 3,4) = 68 rows from starting the armhole shaping to starting the shoulder shaping.

After you know the amount of rows you have for shaping the neckline you need to know how much rows you need for the neckline itself.

For example: If you want to have a depth of your neckline with 14 cm, you have  (14 x 3,4) = 47, 6 = 48 rows for your neckline shaping.

ATTENTION PLEASE: You have 48 rows for neckline shaping, if you don’t do a shoulder shaping! If you are adding a shoulder shaping, which I recommend, you need to subtract the rows of your shoulder shaping from this calculated rows.

For example: Your shoulder shaping is knitted in 6 rows. 48 rows – 6 rows = 42 rows.

Now you know exactly how much rows you have for shaping the front neckline. And you are now able to calculate how many rows after starting your armhole shaping you have to knit, before you divide for the front opening.

In our example: 68 rows – 42 rows = 26 rows. This means 26 rows AFTER starting the armhole shaping the shaping of the v neck is starting.

Well, now you need to calculate how to do the decreases. For this calculation you need to know how many stitches you have to decrease for the front opening. Usually as much as for the back.

For example: You have to decrease a total of 36 stitches for the neck opening. Now you have to divide this amount of stitches with 2, because you will decrease the stitches on either side of the neck opening. (36 : 2) = 18 sts. Now you also know how many stitches you have to decrease.

You now know how many rows you have to knit for the neck opening (42 rows) and you know how many stitches you have to decrease knitting these rows (18 stitches). You should now calculate how often you have to do a decrease.

In our example: 42 rows : 18 stitches = 2,3 rows. This means every 2,33 row you have to decrease a stitch to form the neckline. Wait a minute, we all know, you are not able to knit 2,33 rows! So you have to decide how want to arrange the decreases.

You may do nothing and decrease every second row. This means in our example you knit (18 x 2) = 36 rows shaping the front opening and knit the last 6 rows without shaping.

Or you may decrease 15 stitches every second row and three stitches every forth row. This means in our example you knit (15 x 2) = 30 rows plus (3 x 4) = 12 rows, a total of 42 rows for shaping the front opening. Perfect, isn’t it?

Front opening

Front opening

I recommend to draw a chart!

I have done one for my version of Trinity using Excel, because I also added some stripes to the design.

Schematic Trinity

Schematic Trinity

This schematic shows the left half of the front.

Remember, if you are modifying a design you now also have to recalculate the stitches for your neckband. Because, if you knit a closer neckline the stitches given in the pattern will be to many.

An easy way to knit the neckband without calculating the stitches is: Pick up and knit one stitch for each bound-off stitch along horizontal edges and about three stitches for every four rows, along vertical or slanted edges.

Or: To determine the number of stitches to pick up (or cast on, if you plan to knit the neckband separately and sew it in place), sew the shoulder seams, then lay the garment right side up on a flat surface. Turn a tape measure on its side and measure the inner circumference of the neck opening. Multiply this measurement by the appropriate stitch tension (“Swatch?”, Anne says) to determine how many stitches to pick up.

Don’t miss to follow my dear friend Kristen on her blog to catch up how she is knitting Trinity.

 

The Knitter issue 70 – A review

Tags

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This week The Knitter Magazine 70 arrived on my iPad. This issue comes with 15 beautiful patterns, featuring a platinum collection.

Be inspired by Alana Dakos Botanical Knits 2, which is available as a PDF download or a printed version on www.botanicalknits.com.

Take a trip to Shetland with your travel guide Sarah Laurenson, who is talking about all the must-see destinations for yarn fans on the isles and learn to adapt sock heel flaps for the perfect fit with Clare Devine.

And finally meet Rachel Coopey. Beloved for her vibrant and entertaining sock patterns, she is now treating her fans to accessory designs.

This soft, draping poncho has a pattern of rippling colour and lace

Maisie by Anniken Allis

Maisie by Anniken Allis

“This on trend poncho is perfect for layering on chilly spring days”, says designer Anniken Allis. It’s constructed from two knitted rectangles, joined along the shoulders and tool of arms, with buttons at the lower edge. By knitting it sideways, the self-striping yarn from Noro will create vertical stripes, which emphasize the rippling lace pattern. Noro‘s Shiro  yarn (Aran weight, 40% wool, 30% cashmere, 30% silk)is a wonderfully tactile blend of wool, cashmere and silk, and comes in both subtle and bold colourways.

This long-sleeved jumper is such a versatile design

The Cruise by Sublime

The Cruise by Sublime

The light, airy pattern is ideal for spring and cooler summer days, while the pretty lace will look as good paired with jeans as it will with a skirt. It’s knitted in Sublime‘s Egyptian Cotton DK (DK weight, 100% cotton), a glossy yarn that knits up into a lustrous fabric, with a crisp handle and outstanding stitch definition. It comes in 21 rich, jewel-like shades and gentle pastels.

Go for relaxed style with this men’s merino cardigan – its easygoing fit will be coveted by women, too!

Prestbury by Rita Taylor

Prestbury by Rita Taylor

Rita Taylor is known for her knitwear designs with a vintage feel, and this men’s cardigan was inspired by an old photograph of men sitting in a French café. “They all looked so stylish!” Rita says, For her muted, zigzag colourwork she has used John Arbon‘s Knit By Numbers yarn (DK weight, 100% merino), a worsted-spun merino from Devon that comes in an amazing 85 shades.

Knit this decorative striped scarf from the Fine Art Accessories Collection

Sisibi by Lisa Richardson

Sisibi by Lisa Richardson

This lightweight skinny scarf by Lisa Richardson features an unusual textured stripe pattern in coffee-and-cream shades, and will add an elegant touch to your outfit. It’s been designed using Rowan‘s Fine Art yarn (45% wool, 20% mohair, 10% silk, 25% polyamide), which is a 4ply blend of merino, kid mohair, mulberry silk and nylon. It comes in a range of 14 colours, both semi-solid and self-striping, and knits up into a fabric with a luxurious feel and a gentle halo.

 Modern peplum jacket with a delicate shawl collar is decorated with tiny beaded motifs

Ore by Sarah Hatton

Ore by Sarah Hatton

Sarah Hatton’s jacket is our ideal blend of modern and vintages aesthetics. Its neat shape, peplum and little moss stitch collar are on-trend for this season yet have a timeless feel. Sarah has adorned her jacket with a band of simple beading, which adds texture and weight to the supple, draping fabric provided by Rowan‘s Baby Merino Silk DK yarn (DK weight, 66% wool, 34% silk).

Shimmering yarn in shades of bronze and titanium brings a luxurious quality to this airy, drop-stitch cowl

Precious Metal by Emma Vining

Precious Metal by Emma Vining

Inspired by the ripple patterns formed by the wind on drifting snow, this cowl blends a light and airy stitch pattern with a chunky, shimmering yarn. The dropped stitch rib pattern is reversible and uses short-row shaping to form the ripples and drifts. The cowl can be worn in a big loop or wrapped around your neck twice for a cosy feel. Emma Vining used Sirdar’s Softspun Chunky yarn (Chunky weight, 53% nylon, 24% wool, 23% acrylic) for her design.

With its intriguing silhouette and beautiful textures, this cardigan makes a big impression

Rhodium by Deborah Helmke

Rhodium by Deborah Helmke

This draping cardigan by Deborah Helmke is packed with details that make it elegant to wear and a joy to knit. It features a shawl collar, batwing sleeves and front sections which are longer than the back, while a rich lace band highlighted with beads adds texture and interest. The Louisa Harding Orielle yarn ( DK weight, 97% baby alpaca, 3% metallic polyamide) lends the garment a sublet touch of sparkle, too.

Elegantly simple chain-link necklace uses beads an a sparkling yarn for a subtle shimmer

Argentite by Juliet Bernard

Argentite by Juliet Bernard

This chain-link necklace by Juliet Bernard is so quick to knit and elegant to wear. The yarn is used doubled throughout, using either one each of Rowan‘s Kidsilk Haze Eclipse (Laceweight, 66% mohair, 27% silk, 4% polyester, 3% nylon) and Fine Lace (80% alpaca, 20% wool) ( for the links) or two ends of the Lace together. Your will have some yarn left over at the end of the project, so why not experiment by mixing the yarns and creating your own unique jewelry?

A sophisticated shape and graceful lace pattern bring a refined beauty to this silky cardigan

Pewter by Fiona Morris

Pewter by Fiona Morris

Barbara Walker’s classic stitch pattern treasuries inspired the design of this beautiful cardigan. “I chose her Hourglass Lace pattern because it offers both knit and purl variations, and a double yarnover to create a large picot eyelet within the pattern,” says Fiona Morris. “The purl variation works well  in the welts and cuffs, as it provides a flat fabric compared with the stocking stitch version.” Worked in Fyberspates‘ luxurious Scrumptious High Twist DK (DK weight, 50% superwash merino, 50% silk), this will become a wardrobe favourite.

Knitted in a palette of charcoal and white,

Atlantic Waves by Tara Joensen

Atlantic Waves by Tóra Joensen

this graphic patterned jumper has a modern feel yet harks back t traditional Scandinavian designs. It’s knitted in the round to the armpits, then the front and back are completed separately following the colourwork charts for the Fair Isle sections. The design has been created for Faroese yarn company Navia by Tóra Joenson, and uses the brand’s Duo sportweight wool (Sport/Baby weight, 100% wool), which ist light and soft.

Knit this cabled and ribbed sweater from the Fine Art Aran Mini Collection, a design by Kim Hargreaves

Dali by Kim Hargreaves

Dali by Kim Hargreaves

This classic pattern from the Rowan archives, created by Kim Hargreaves, has been reworked to showcase Rowan‘s new yarn, Fine Art Aran (Aran weight, 50% wool, 25% alpaca, 20% mohair, 5% silk). T his luxurious blond of merino, kid mohair, alpaca and mulberry silk is hand painted to achieve stunning colour effects. Kim’s design is a loose-fitting, wide-necked jumper with a cable and ribbed pattern that should knit up relatively quickly. This design is originally published in Mini Collection Fine Art Aran by Rowan. This mini collection featuring the luxurious yarn Fine Art Aran showcases 8 easy to wear designs taken from the Rowan archive and originally designed by Kim Hargreaves and Martin Storey. There’s definitely something for everyone in this collection ranging from a simple slouchy hat to oversized collared jacket.

Girls will feel stylish and comfortable in this basket weave pattern jacket

Petite Etoile by Bergère de France

Petite Étoile by Bergère de France

This long jacket for girls aged two to eight years looks smart yet will be cosy and comfortable to wear. The stitch pattern produces a basketweave-effect fabric; touches of whimsy are provided by the fabric star patch on the back neck, and bright buttons. It’s knitted in Bergère de France‘s Barisienne, a robust, easy-care DK yarn (DK weight, 100% acrylic) which comes in 35 appealing shades, from neutrals and pastels to bright colours.

The Knitter Mini Collection

Shelby by Rachel  Coopey

Shelby by Rachel Coopey

Rachel Coopey is much loved for her playful, creative socks, and her latest design blends tiny, twisting patterns to produce a beautifully textured fabric. Columns of right-crossing and left-crossing stitches combined with yarnovers flow straight down from the cuff, and are mirrored on each foot. Rachel has used a slipped-stitch heel flap – for advice on adapting heel flaps for a better fit, see the Masterclass in this issue. Shelby is shown here in Bergère de France‘s Perfection (4ply weight, 65% wool, 35% polyamide).

Ten-Stitch Socks by Elizabeth Lovick

Ten-Stitch Socks by Elizabeth Lovick

This basic sock is designed to be made using any stitch pattern with a 10-stitch-repeat.

Heliotrope by Faye Perriam

Heliotrope by Faye Perriam

This toe-up design by Faye Perriam is like a breath of fresh air for your feet, with its vivid colour and exquisite textures. The pattern of leaves, cables and open knot stitches neatly extends up into  the cuff. Using Judy’s Magic Cast-On method this design is shown here in Artesano‘s Definition Sock (4ply weight, 75% machine washable merino wool, 25% polyamide).

The next issue of The Knitter will be on Sale April 29. It will feature free cable patterns by Martin Storey and designs from Anniken Allis, Eline Oftedal, Sarah Hatton, Marie Wallin, Judy Furlong … and more.

All pictures shown above are screenshots from my digital magazine.

SHEKNITS/HEKNITS – A KAL2 with Kristen & Konrad

Tags

, , , ,

Now here is the second post for our “KAL2 with Kristen & Konrad”.

As you already know we have chosen Trinity a design by Lisa Richardson from the Pure Linen Collection.

Today I will show you my suggested modifications:

Suggested modifications

Suggested modifications

I will knit the Rowan Pure Linen not with the suggested needle size (4,5mm) but with 3mm needles to produce a tighter tension and a closer fabric. This means I have to recalculate the complete garment. (Which I have already done!)

What do you think?

Here is a first pic of my Trinity.

Trinity

Trinity

Don’t miss the blog of Kristen, showing her progress of knitting with Rowan Pure Linen.

 

Going to crochet! – Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014

Tags

, , , , ,

Some weeks ago I joined Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014. 

Although I have learned to crochet at primary school for me – as a knitter – a crochet hook is a dangerous thing. It is normally used as an emergency tool and not really regularly.

But Jane Crowfoot is providing a ton of hints for this Crochet Club 2014, about

  • the colour palette
  • tension
  • working out yarn amounts, if you want to change the suggested yarn
  • basic stitches
  • the difference between UK and US abbreviations and symbols
  • how to read a chart

There are also technique downloads and a crochet hook guide.

I follow Jane Crowfoot’s yarn suggestions and use Rowan Cotton Glacé for this project.

Rowan Cotton Glacé for Jane Crowfoots Crochet Club 2014

Rowan Cotton Glacé for Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014

So, although I’m not an experience crocheter, it is easy for me to follow. And I really enjoy to crochet the patterns coming with this Club. But before starting to crochet the patterns I followed Jane’s advice to do a swatch and to adjust my hook size.

Swatch for Jane Crowfoots Crochet Club 2014 using Rowan Cotton Glacé

Swatch for Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014 using Rowan Cotton Glacé

This is a mystery Club and only the participants know the patterns and the yarns. But I want to tease you with some pictures of the first two sets.

Jane Crowfoots Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoots Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoots Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoots Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoots Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoots Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoots Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoots Crochet Club 2014

Jane Crowfoot’s Crochet Club 2014

Now I’m looking forward for the next set of patterns, which will arrive April 10th.

Happy crocheting and knitting!

SHEKNITS/HEKNITS – A KAL2 with Kristen & Konrad

Tags

, , , ,

Now here is our “KAL2 with Kristen & Konrad”.

This time we are using Rowan Pure Linen and are knitting a design by Lisa Richardson from the supporting brochure Pure Linen Collection.

We have chosen Trinity.

Kristen will knit it to fit for her and I will modify it to fit it for a men (ok, actually for myself, teehee).

Here is a close up picture of this design.

Trinity by Lisa Richardson

Trinity by Lisa Richardson

Trinity by Lisa Richardson

Trinity by Lisa Richardson

I have already received my Rowan Pure Linen in shade Kalahari from my online shop.

Rowan Pure Linen

Rowan Pure Linen

The next weeks Kristen and I will share our progress of knitting and modifying Trinity by Lisa Richardson.

Looking at the picture of Trinity, how would you modify this pattern? Especially knitting it for a man?

 

Sheknits/Heknits – A KAL with Kristen and Konrad

Tags

, , , ,

Sometimes it is harder to take pictures than to knit a garment.

Every time I wanted to take the final pictures the weather was bad, no sun, sometimes rain. But every time the sun came out, I have no time for taking pictures. Annoying. But finally it worked.

Here are the pictures of the modified Pond. If you are interested what has been modified you may read it here.

Pond by knittingkonrad

Pond by knittingkonrad

Pond by knittingkonrad

Pond by knittingkonrad

Pond by knittingkonrad

Pond by knittingkonrad

Pond by knittingkonrad

Pond by knittingkonrad

Some advices for using Rowan Silkystones

Rowan describes this yarn as “a melange of toussah silk and linen”. It contains 52% silk and 48% linen.

Silk

Silk, as we know, is one of the strongest natural fibres but loses up to 20% of its strength when wet. Its elasticity is moderate to poor. It can be weakened if exposed to too much sunlight. It comes from the filaments spun by silkworms to form their cocoons. Silk has great insulation properties, and, like wool, it breathes and is comfortable next to the skin. Silk is very strong and can be spun into very fine yarn. Silk is nonresilient and can stretch. The careful cultivation and processing required for manufacture makes silk an expensive yarn. It is often blended with other fibres.

Linen (Flax)

Is one of the oldest known textile fibres, it is derived from the stem of the flax plant. Linen is sturdy and durable, and like cotton, is comfortable to wear in hot climates because it draws moisture away from the body. Is is also easily laundered and moth and perspiration resistent. But linen is also a heavy an nonresiliant fiber that can feel stiff, although it softens with repeated washing. It is usually spun into very fine yarns to compensate for its weight. Unlike cotton, linen is weaker when wet and prone to abrasion. Linen is usually blended with other fibres to offset this drawbacks.

From these facts you get the following rules to follow while working with Rowan Silkystones:

  • Knit a swatch and wash it carefully!
  • Block it, but do not stretch it!
  • Block your garment using the spray method!

Wash & Care your garment made with Rowan Silkystones, remember:

  • Silk has the tendency to lose dye when submerged in water!
  • Silk and Linen has the tendency to lose strength when wet!
  • Silk and Linen are nonresilient yarns!

How to wash your Rowan Silkystones garment?

My suggestions:

  1. Be very gentle during the hand wash process!
  2. Do not wring the garment out, just squeeze it!
  3. To prevent leakage of colour when washing, put some salt in the water to help the colourfastness.
  4. Wrap it in a towel to remove excess water but don’t roll it into the towel, just squeeze out the water, while the garment is lying flat!
  5. Then lay it out flat easing the garment back into shape!

Rowan Silkystones tends to grow a bit. Knowing this you should think of 

  1. knitting and washing washing your swatch, before blocking it! (again)
  2. Adding minimal or no ease to your body measurements and
  3. if you want a snug fitting garment even negative ease!
  4. Move over to Kristens blog and read about her experience finishing Margot using Rowan Silkystones!

A Lamentation for Rowan Calmer

Tags

, , ,

Have you ever expirienced a beloved yarn to be discontinued (how I hate this word)? How brutal it feels, deep in your knitters heart! How you wanted to buy all of this yarn you are able to afford? How you can’t let go?

Rowan Calmer is this yarn for me. I have never had a cotton yarn before or after Calmer that satisfied me so much during knitting and has this characteristics. Being soft and stretchy the same time. Easy to knit and lovely to wear! But it is gone, long ago.

This year we have a really early spring with sunshine and warm weather here in Germany and so I searched my stash for an appropriate yarn and found some of my long gone friend (in cloud and aqua). I decided to knit it in one of my preferred methods. A raglan-shaped sweater knitted seamlessly in the round from the bottom up with no grafting at all, perfect!

Here is the result:

Lamentation for Calmer

Lamentation for Calmer

I added a Missioni-inspired zig-zag pattern to add stripes at the upper part. (Stripes are so en vogue this spring.)

Lamentation for Calmer (Back)

Lamentation for Calmer (Back)

Lamentation for Calmer (Raglan Detail)

Lamentation for Calmer (Raglan Detail)

The sleeves are also knitted in the round and joined to the body using a 3-needle-bind-off.

Lamentation for Calmer (Faux Seam Detail)

Lamentation for Calmer (Faux Seam Detail)

I guess I should shout out loud: Bring back Calmer, Rowan!

Who is shouting with me?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 831 other followers